More Flexibility Offered for Annual Dues Payments

Update 10/9/20: Disney has issued the following statement regarding the upcoming autopay feature:

Dear Disney Vacation Club Member: Dues Credit Card Autopay is now available for U.S. Members that want to pay DVC Annual Dues in full each year on January 15th using a credit card! If you would like to set up recurring annual payments using a credit card, click here prior to December 10th to register your credit card. On January 15th, we will process your payment automatically. Monthly autopay is still available to Members with a U.S. bank account on file. No action is required if you prefer monthly autopay and are already registered.


You may have quickly glanced over it, but this month Disney Vacation Club Member Insider offered a sneak peek at a new annual dues payment option that will be available this November!

Previously DVC Annual Dues could be paid one of two ways:

  • Full One-Time Payment via credit card, debit card, or Disney gift card.
  • Monthly Auto-Debit from a checking or savings account.

Rolling out this November, Disney Vacation Club will also allow members the opportunity to set up a monthly auto-pay for annual dues via credit card.

This option is one that DVC Members have been requesting for some time, as it provides for greater flexibility and the potential at some savings when it comes to that bill we all dread seeing each year. Depending on your credit card rewards program, you could rack up enough rewards to enjoy a nice dinner at Walt Disney World by paying for your dues this way. This is also a huge benefit for international members who have historically had even more limited payment options.

Are you excited to finally have this credit card option for monthly DVC Annual Dues payments? Let us know your thoughts in the comments!

17 thoughts on “More Flexibility Offered for Annual Dues Payments

  • October 8, 2020 at 9:48 am
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    Any credit card ?

    • October 8, 2020 at 11:00 am
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      We’ll find out more in November, but I would assume any major credit card that Disney accepts regularly will be acceptable.

  • October 8, 2020 at 11:21 am
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    Well it’s a great option.
    Just wondering if Chase Disney Visa will consider it a “Disney” purchase at the 2% level.

    • October 8, 2020 at 1:23 pm
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      Hope so!! Chase would be smart to try and get them to set it up that way. otherwise, it’s going on my other cash back card…

    • October 8, 2020 at 7:39 pm
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      I don’t know, but generally Aspiration gives me 3% cash back on Disney purchases (including when making manual payments on my loan that is now paid off), so should be interesting to see where that lies.

  • October 8, 2020 at 1:31 pm
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    Yeah, but will it be available for international members?

  • October 8, 2020 at 2:29 pm
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    And will there be a fee for this “service”?

    • October 8, 2020 at 4:11 pm
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      I would not expect a fee… Just more flexibility for members to pay. We will learn more next month! 🙂

      • October 8, 2020 at 5:23 pm
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        This could be a good way to reach introductory offers on new credit cards, or use something like citi double cash and get 2% back

  • October 8, 2020 at 6:57 pm
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    I feel having to pay the full amount is unfair. WDW was closed for a while and now they are laying off thousands of employees and we still have to pay full dues. We don’t get full access to parks either. Masks required everywhere
    Class action law suit I hope

    • October 8, 2020 at 7:42 pm
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      Umm, you do understand how this works right?

      You pay the full amount throughout the year, this is based on estimated operating costs. Then at the end of the year, they calculate what the actual operating costs per point for your resort were for the year.

      They multiply by the number of points you had for the year, then deduct how much you paid. If there is a credit left over, it is applied towards next year’s dues or in some cases refunded. If you didn’t pay enough, it rolls into next years dues.

      Obviously their operating costs are going to be substantially lower this year, so there will be adjustments made for next year, should be interesting to see how that plays out in places like California that have legal limits in place on how much dues can increase from year to year. But that is getting a lot more complicated.

    • October 9, 2020 at 1:15 pm
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      Agreed…plus non American DVC Members can’t visit. With strict quarantine rules most people cannot get the time off or unpaid.

    • October 10, 2020 at 3:13 am
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      I dont know if you have children but if yes and they were not.aloud to go to school…are you asking money back.also because there not using the school building? I hope you pay for there school every year. If you are kidness enough you pay the normal dues. The whole world were not aloud to travel either.

  • October 9, 2020 at 12:12 pm
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    !!!!! Boy, just no shame, is there?! You are already thinking and planning of another way to make payments for a service that has been obsolete or shut down 80% of the 2020 year. Instead of letting us[DVD members] know what you have planned about a credit we should ALL RECEIVE,I mean really, think it is safe to say over 75% of all DVC members did not use ANY OF THEIR POINTS this year because of the situation at hand. We get it, things happen, no one is saying that it is Disney’s fault or anyone else for that matters fault…..but the FACT REMAINS. DVC members have paid for a service that was not able for us to use. You have mentioned before that their were talks[talks? like really!!] about what and if something would be presented to DVC members BEFORE the end of the year, AND, BEFORE you start sending out the new annual dues bills for 2021. Well, just a reminder…..we are almost there! 11 weeks to be exact till the end of the year. So PLEASE, before you start TRYING to make us happy with a new method of paying up, how’s about YOU PAY UP TO ALL OF US! We deserve it and it’s fair and the RIGHT THING TO DO. We will see if the Mouse takes his cheese and scurries back in it’s hole keeping it all for himself, or…..shares back to the other mice what is rightfully there’s. On a lasting note….please, do NOT try to explain to us that their is still maintenance and upgrade fees to be paid. You, I and all of us know…….mostly EVERYTHING has been shut down and costs in no shape or form should be the norm as any other year. This is NOT like any other year. Be well, stay safe…..and do what is right…..PAY UP.

    • October 9, 2020 at 3:36 pm
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      I totally agree with Denny Fagon! We were not able to use our points for several months at any of the parks or resorts due to shutdown. We were going to Aulani to use banked and current points. Especially those DVC members who pay in full each year. Cast members were furloughed. DVC members couldn’t go to Disney who were not residents of Florida. When out of state DVC members were allowed to go, we had to quarantine for 14 days upon return home.
      That alone squashed the desire to go. At the very least, DVC members should get a credit towards their 2021 dues.

  • October 10, 2020 at 9:40 am
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    Got that email from DVC Accounting but it doesn’t make sense. There was always the option to pay annually by credit card. I guess they’re trying to tell us they won’t be allowing monthly payments by credit card. You’d think they’d throw us a bone and allow it considering there were months we couldn’t use our points.

  • October 12, 2020 at 9:08 am
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    I agree it’s been a frustrating year with travel restrictions. However, I don’t agree with those want a refund on their dues. Dues are calculated based on taxes, the previous year’s repairs and planned capital spending. They’re then apportioned by the number of points you own – not the full year. The “refund” we should see as owners should be lower dues next year because there should be significantly less required in repairs on the properties and the reduction of capital spending.

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